Sometimes, they write themselves (Ibland skriver de själva)

It’s good to know that websites in non English speaking countries have a propensity to being ridiculously laid out to maximise advertising revenue as much as their English contemporaries.

Having got that off my chest, the English language Swedish online news service The Local is reporting that Sweden have had to withdraw a new word due to a complaint by Google.

There are so many WTF‘s right here that I barely know where to start. Let’s start with the obvious, the story:

In December, the Language Council unveiled its annual list of new Swedish words. Among the words added to the Swedish language in 2012 was “ogooglebar” (‘ungoogleable’). But the California-based multinational objected.

“It’s not just about our definition of the word; we also tried to describe how users define the word and Google had opinions about that,” Language Council head Ann Cederberg told Sveriges Radio (SR).

The word was to be used to describe something “that you can’t find on the web with the use of a search engine”, according to the Language Council.

However, Google was less than thrilled that a word based on its name had been highlighted by Sweden’s “official language cultivation body”.

(For those that are interested, here’s more on the Swedish Language Council, Wikipedia. Fascinatingly, the Swedish term for the Swedish Language Council, Språkvård,

is a loan translation of the German word “Sprachpflege”. Literally, språkvård means ‘language care’, but is often translated as language cultivation or language planning.)

Of course, even the most obviously odd part of this story, is quickly derailed:

According to SR, Google wanted the council to specify that the word’s definition only covered searches performed using Google, and not searches involving other search engines.
After a protracted exchange with lawyers at the US internet company in which Google lawyers “tried to influence our way of defining the word”, the Language Council finally opted to remove “ogooglebar” from the 2012 list of new Swedish words.

Google wanted to…they…redefine…not just Google…wat?

Thankfully, common sense prevailed – there’s a reason why the rest of the world is jealous of the Scandinavians – they are so reasonable, rational and socially democratic:

Cederberg explained that taking on the US search giant took “too much time and resources” and that the word already exists in Swedish.

“It’s the users of the language who decide if it will remain,” she said.

“So if the word exists, use it if you want. That’s something Google can’t decide.”

Speaking with the TT news agency, Cederberg disputed allegations that the Language Council had allowed itself to be censured by Google.

“Google hasn’t won anything with this,” she said.

According to Cederberg, the Language Council could have ignored Google’s requests, but decided to remove the word in order to spark a debate.

“We thought it would be useful to start talking about this; we have have nothing to lose,” she told TT.

Google now have enabled the Streisand effect – their complaint has bought more publicity to the word. And as the Language Council have noted, it wont stop people using the word – in fact, this act will almost certainly enshrine the word within the lexicon.

Since we are here – not only do the Language Council “announce” new words, which always seems so…arse end round really, but there’s a top ten – and there are some really winners here:

5. Nomofob (Nomophobe)

A person who feels anxious at the mere thought of being separated from their mobile phone. An abbreviation of the English “no mobile phone phobia”.

4. Köttrymd (Flesh space)

The non-digital world and the opposite to cyber space. For example: “I’m going to log off Facebook for a while and see what’s going on in flesh space.”

But nothing can really beat the best new Swedish word of 2012:

1. Tårtgate (Cakegate)

The political fallout when Sweden’s Culture Minister Lena Adelsohn Liljeroth cut into a cake shaped as a stereotype of a black woman, invoking images of female mutilation. For example: “She should resign over Cakegate!”

You really should follow the link above to see the image. It’s hard to know if it is that quirky ultra libertarian left Swedish Art humour, or if it’s an actual honest to his-noodly-greatness act of political suicide. I guess either reason just adds to the list of reasons why we would like to be Swedish – it’s very funny if it’s meant to be humorous, and it’s very funny if it’s political suicide. Either way, we all win.

For those that want to go right down the rabbit hole, there’s also the ubiquitous ten X words you wont find in Y (X = Swedish, Y = English).

Update:

Well, this was always going to blow up I guess. And it’s blowing up in a way that justifies my posting – a couple of mentions here and there, but fffffat have taken the cake (lololololololololo): http://www.ogooglebar.se/

fffffat were also good enough to point me somewhere that I really should have gone last night: the Swedish Language Council’s press release in this regard – a magnificent slap down. To complete the loop of creepy, I present it here, as translated by Google Translate (evil laugh!):

Google does not own the language!

26/03/2013

The company Google has wooed Language Council to amend the definition of the word ogooglebar the new order list. Today we instead delete the word and marks while our displeasure with Google’s attempt to control the language.

We have removed ogooglebar from the new order list. Why? One of the things that Språkrådet is known is the annual new order list. It is published at the end of the year and usually lead to discussions of word to be or not to be, their fitness and longevity.One purpose of neologisms list is to show how society and language development, interacting with each other. On the 2012 list was the word ogooglebar with, in the sense ‘that can not be found on the web using a search engine’. But since the new order list was presented in December 2012, the company Google has worked to influence the Language Council of Management of the word. Google refers to the laws that protect brands and want the Language Council amends the definition version of the name Google in the definition and add a ‘disclaimer’ where we emphasize that Google is a trademark.

Språkrådet have tried to explain the new order list in proposing solutions that do that we do not deviate from our basic approach to language. No one can define words which must be in the language or languages ​​of the users’ definition of a word. The definition Language Council states have been formulated based on how the word is used in Swedish., we have neither the time nor the inclination to pursue the lengthy process that Google is trying to launch. Nor do we compromise and change the definition of ogooglebar to it that the company wants. It would go against our principles – and language principles. Google has namely forgot one thing: language development do not care about brand protection. No individual can decide about the language. Whoever in the future googling on ogooglebar will not only find the wording that Google wanted to change, and that will remain online despite Language Council amended the list. Anyone looking will also find all the possible comments that follow after the news spread that word removed. That is how the internet world works.

 

Who decides the language? We do language users. We decide together which words should be and how they are defined, used and spelled. The language is the result of an ongoing democratic process. Everyone is in deciding which words are established in the language by choosing the words we use. Do we want ogooglebar the language we will use the word and it is our use determines meaning – no multinational company with leverage.

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